Issue N0: 10


How To Test Your Software To Avoid Technical Glitches

During the SEC's market technology roundtable, GETCO CTO Jonathan Ross argued that market participants must follow several testing best practices to avoid technical glitches.

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The Future of human/ Electronic skin technology

Merging biology and electronics gives access to a new and upcoming technology. This has led to the development of a super thin and highly flexible material like a tattoo, embedded with a wireless electronic chip to be stuck on human skin.

 

read more...

New radar technology helps see through walls

Researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory have devised a new mechanism that allows to spot activities on the other side of the solid wall obstruction, something which was more of a sci-fi phenomenon until now.

We can see our environment, spot objects and activities because of the light reflecting from them back to our eyes/ retinas. This is one of the scientific factors that make our ‘visual experiences’ possible. If the light is reflecting from a solid wall, we can only visually experience the ‘wall’ and not the environment behind that is being obstructed. Now, what we are talking about is called ‘visible light’; which doesn’t really help in seeing through obstructions.

read more...

A Bright Future for EHRs, but When?

A broad consensus exists about the future viability of electronic health records, yet there remains a good deal of dissension over when and how that future arrives. Indeed, recent polling conducted by Health Data Management bears this out, with nearly equal numbers of respondents predicting either rapid or gradual growth of EHRs.

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Welcome to the world of Handwriting Analysis

Handwriting Analysis is the study of relationship between handwriting and personality. Handwriting analysis can quickly reveal such factors as your character, emotions, intellect, creativity, social adjustment, your desires, fears, weaknesses, strengths and sexua.l .

read more...

Detailed Articles

How To Test Your Software To Avoid Technical Glitches

Watch Wall Street & Technology and Advanced Trading's on-demand video analysis of the SEC's market technology roundtable: here.

The technical errors that have recently befallen Knight Capital, BATS and Nasdaq causing chaos to the markets are not the result of complexity or fragmented markets, but the result of basic technology 101 issues, SEC chairperson Mary Schapiro said today during the agency's market technology roundtable.

During the SEC discussion, Dr Nancy Leveson, professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems, MIT, argued that software errors will always happen. The financial industry, like the aviation industry, needs solutions beyond technology – which must include strong regulation. " Most industries have government agencies overseeing with an iron hand.

The aircraft industry knows people will stop flying if planes start falling out of the sky. You cannot build an unsinkable ship or unfailable software. If you engage in hubris and wishful thinking, you will have to suffer the consequences," Leveson said.

Still, GETCO CTO Jonathan Ross argued that in order to avoid technical glitches, firms must follow several testing best practices: These include having independently designed systems, he said.

"To the extent possible, systems should be independent from other systems to limit the potential for an error or failure to cascade to other systems," he said, adding that any changes to systems must be small, incremental and frequent to reduce the magnitude of any errors and make it easier to mitigate the impact of such errors if they do occur.

Ross also suggested using layered, redundant risk measures, with multiple, overlapping levels of preventive or protective risk controls that each look at a system independently.

GETCO has a formal process for testing its software, Ross noted. This includes a testing lab, testing protocols that developers follow, and change management processes, he wrote in a statement for the SEC.

"Development and testing should reinforce each other; continuous building and testing gives developers a strong feedback loop," he said. In the development cycle, common approaches to software testing firms should follow include unit testing – or tests of discrete, generally small, specific and functional, components of the system.

Best practices should also include regression testing, or tests built specifically to address a bug previously identified and to prevent the reintroduction of that bug and integration testing, or system tests designed to test the interaction of applications with each other or outside parties.

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The Future of human/ Electronic skin technology

Merging biology and electronics gives access to a new and upcoming technology. This has led to the development of a super thin and highly flexible material like a tattoo, embedded with a wireless electronic chip to be stuck on human skin. It’s applications are many, from monitoring health to even sending commands to human-machine interfaces like video games. The newly developed material/device is easily removable, as easily it’s stuck on the skin surface.

The device is designed to easily blend in with the mechanics of the human skin, where it can resist the natural vigor of twists, turns and stretches of the human skin, yet maintaining the functionality of the wireless circuitry. The research is being led by John A. Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder professor of engineering at the University of Illinois.

A number of technological challenges must be surmounted before EHRs are widely adopted, Schubert says. "Today's average interaction by a health services consumer still involves a 19th century paperwork trail, and that drives costs up, efficiencies down, and improper diagnosis and treatment," he says. "There are major challenges, though, that will need to be overcome such as universal data taxonomy, ease-of-use for the consumers and providers, personal information safeguards, and checks-and-balances to ensure that the data is good and remains good."

“The vision is to exploit these concepts in systems that have self-contained, integrated functionality, perhaps ultimately working in a therapeutic fashion with closed feedback control based on integrated sensors, in a coordinated manner with the body itself,” Rogers said.

 

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New radar technology helps see through walls

Researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory have devised a new mechanism that allows to spot activities on the other side of the solid wall obstruction, something which was more of a sci-fi phenomenon until now.

We can see our environment, spot objects and activities because of the light reflecting from them back to our eyes/ retinas. This is one of the scientific factors that make our ‘visual experiences’ possible. If the light is reflecting from a solid wall, we can only visually experience the ‘wall’ and not the environment behind that is being obstructed. Now, what we are talking about is called ‘visible light’; which doesn’t really help in seeing through obstructions.

John Peabody and Gregory Charvat at Lincoln Laboratory have tested an idea that uses radio waves instead of visible light to see through walls. The emitted radar signals pass through the concrete walls and deflect back to the radar receivers easily, with some signals losses in transit. The signal losses aren’t a problem because of the availability of affordable signal amplifying devices.

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A Bright Future for EHRs, but When?

A broad consensus exists about the future viability of electronic health records, yet there remains a good deal of dissension over when and how that future arrives. Indeed, recent polling conducted by Health Data Management bears this out, with nearly equal numbers of respondents predicting either rapid or gradual growth of EHRs. The online polls, with a total of 83 respondents, were conducted as part of a December 2009 (two weeks before the interim meaningful use rules were issued) Health Data Management Webcast, "The Future of Digital Health."

Karl D. Schubert, managing partner and chief technology officer of Minnetonka, Minn.-based TechNova Consulting, falls in the latter camp of expecting a gradual expansion of EHRs. In one of a series of interviews conducted with Webcast participants after the event, he compared the adoption curve with how banks rolled out ATMs. "The future for digital health is bright, but it is not going to happen overnight. It will not be easy, and we will have to invest money to save money and improve health care in the long run."

A number of technological challenges must be surmounted before EHRs are widely adopted, Schubert says. "Today's average interaction by a health services consumer still involves a 19th century paperwork trail, and that drives costs up, efficiencies down, and improper diagnosis and treatment," he says. "There are major challenges, though, that will need to be overcome such as universal data taxonomy, ease-of-use for the consumers and providers, personal information safeguards, and checks-and-balances to ensure that the data is good and remains good."

Another source of division among survey respondents was the impact of the spending stipulated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to encourage meaningful EHR adoption (see cover story, page 40). Opinions split almost evenly among those who think federal spending will spur adoption and those who say it is too soon to tell. Twelve percent of survey respondents dismissed the stimulus efforts as a boondoggle.

Brett Harnett, research assistant professor and chief, division of I.T. at the University of Cincinnati Dept. of Surgery, says the federal push will catalyze EHR adoption. Like many other respondents, he likens the program to a mandate. Although the program does not specifically require an EHR, it does eventually penalize those without one by reducing their government reimbursements. "The government has taken a two-pronged approach to the adoption of EHRs," he says. "First by mandating it and second by incentivizing it. Although there are issues to resolve such as interoperability and unique patient identification numbers, the incentive represents a financial 'carrot' that should be embraced by providers."

Donna DuLong, a consultant at Ridgefield, Conn.-based Apelon Inc., medical terminology management software provider, agrees the stimulus will speed EHRs along the path toward widespread use. "The federal I.T. stimulus program will not only raise awareness for the need to adopt EHRs, but more importantly, fuel the debate about how EHRs need to improve our ability to deliver higher quality patient care," she says.

Erin Stevenson, a digital health care consultant at Redwood Medical Consulting, Bayside, Calif., says EHRs' ability to improve outcomes for doctors and patients will spur adoption. "There are still bumps in the road, but inevitably patients win from better and more timely and targeted treatment, potentially earlier intervention and treatment of life-altering health conditions. Doctors can improve their quality of service and bottom line, decrease mistakes, expand their patient base and have access to advanced decision support resources."

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Welcome to the world of Handwriting Analysis

Handwriting Analysis is the study of relationship between handwriting and personality. Handwriting analysis can quickly reveal such factors as your character, emotions, intellect, creativity, social adjustment, your desires, fears, weaknesses, strengths and sexual appetite just to mention a few.

Why Use Handwriting Analysis ?

It saves you time in accurately finding out all about a person. Ask yourself how long does it take, for example, when befriending, living with one another, to really determine what he or she is really like? What would normally take weeks, months or even years, can be accomplished in only minutes.

Furthermore handwriting analysis can aid in your business life. It is used in the hiring and promotion process. It can also help determine physical or mental ailments, drug or alcohol use and work style compatibility.

How does handwriting analysis work ?

Handwriting is as an instantaneous photograph of your mind. Your nervous system acts as a wire from brain to hand. A thought in your brain is transmitted by electrical impulses through the nervous system and fibers of your body, arm, hand and fingers. The fingers are only vehicles that put it in writing.

The thoughts and feelings in the human mind have an immediate impact in the formation of handwriting. You will be able to spot differences in the handwriting by comparing your own writing samples written in various moods when you are angry, happy, tired or feeling sick. When you compare these different samples you will be able to see noticeable differences in pen stroke usage, even though your handwriting style remains basically the same.

Handwriting is like an instantaneous photograph of the mind. Just like finger prints, no two handwritings are identical.

What are the uses of Handwriting Analysis ?

Handwriting Analysis can help you understand yourself:

Having an accurate means of uncovering and understanding basic character and personality traits has many advantages; knowing yourself is not the least of them. A handwriting analysis report can help you gain insights into your own strengths and weaknesses. And though you may have to face some unpleasant truths, it will at least enable you to make wiser decisions for your personal and professional life.

Handwriting Analysis can help you understand other people:

Under normal circumstances, it could take years to really get to know someone, and most of us don't have that kind of time or opportunity. With handwriting analysis, you have a quick, sure means of discovering what someone else is like, what their expectations are, and what's the best way to approach them, and this can make your family, social, and business contact that much easier. (Why marry someone to find out whether you can live them - or live with them to find out whether you should marry them- when a careful comparison of your handwriting and their will tell you where or whether you are compatible and where or whether conflicts could arise !)

Handwriting Analysis can help you choose a career:

Vocational analysis can help guide you, and those for whom you do an analysis, in the choice of a career or profession. By pointing out talents, abilities and preferences, it gives you a means of deciding what type of work would best suit you, and just as important, what kind of employment situation to avoid.

Handwriting Analysis is also useful to an employer:

t can help a personnel manager determine whether or not a job applicant is suitable for a particular position, and/or where it's best to place someone. Because handwriting knows no sexual or racial distinctions, graphology is truly an equal opportunity placement tool.

Handwriting Analysis can help you guard your health:

Your handwriting and your physical health are closely related. When you're ill or injured, it affects the smoothness and coordination of your script, and very often an impending illness will show up in handwriting before you're even aware that something is happening to you. As you know, the earlier an illness is spotted, the easier it is to deal with it; and with graphology, you may be the reason someone gets to a doctor for a check up before a disease has a chance to take hold.

Change your handwriting change your life:

Just as your thoughts and feelings can affect the way you form your handwriting, the way you form your handwriting can change your thoughts and feelings. Graphotherapy can be used to effect character and personality changes in anyone who can write. This is not a miracle process; both the preparatory analysis and the therapy procedure take time, and require concentration and hardwork on the part of the writer. But you are how you write - and you can write how you want to be.

And finally, handwriting analysis can be a career:

Especially now, when this science is being recognized by more and more institutions as the accurate counseling and investigative tool it is. There are openings in business, police, departments, hospitals and mental health centers, to name a few. And there is also the possibility of becoming an independent consultant.

 

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